A cross-over cable

The cross-over cable can be made using the same steps as the straight-through cable. The only difference is the order in which the wires are put into the second connector. On the straight-through cable you use the exact same order of wires. On a cross-over cable you use a different order on each end.

The first end uses the same color scheme as a straight-through cable:

W
H
I
T
E
O
R
A
N
G
E
O
R
A
N
G
E
W
H
I
T
E
G
R
E
E
N
B
L
U
E
W
H
I
T
E
B
L
U
E
G
R
E
E
N
W
H
I
T
E
B
R
O
W
N
B
R
O
W
N

The second end uses the following color scheme:

W
H
I
T
E
G
R
E
E
N
G
R
E
E
N
W
H
I
T
E
O
R
A
N
G
E
B
L
U
E
W
H
I
T
E
B
L
U
E
O
R
A
N
G
E
W
H
I
T
E
B
R
O
W
N
B
R
O
W
N

If you take a close look and compare the two ends, you’ll notice how the green and the orange pair trade places, which makes it a cross-over cable.

Note: When you make a cross-over cable, mark it to distinguish it from your straight-through cables. You can put colored tape on it, use a marker, use a different color cable, whatever works for you. If you don’t, eventually you’ll get it mixed in with your other cables and lose your mind trying to figure out why your connection to the network is hosed.

Test It

Once your cable is finished, you should test it to make sure it works. For $20-30 you can purchase a cable tester. Insert the two ends of the cable into the jacks on the tester and watch the lights. If they all light up, you have a good connection for each wire and the cable checks out.

Page 1: Making your own network cable
Page 2: What type of cable do you want to make?
Page 3: Attaching the plug / RJ45 connector
Page 4: Making a crossover cable (this page

Leave a Comment:

sanjay vyas says

nice, and very useful
thanks

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